daintree conspiracy
Daintree Conspiracy
Devoted to equal rights for the Daintree Community and lifting the electricity embargo and other unfair economic sanctions.

Prepare to be amazed! Read about discrimination, hypocrisy, pollution, misfeasance and conspiracy!

INTRODUCTION - THE LATEST POWER FIGHT - THE DAINTREE CONSPIRACY MUSEUM - EXCLUSION FROM THE GRID - BUILDING BAN - ACCESS RESTRICTIONS / THE DAINTREE FERRY - BLOOMFIELD TRACK - DAINTREE GATEWAY - GREAT BARRIER REEF DRIVE - DIVERSION TACTICS - BUYBACK - LOCAL COUNCIL - FNQ REGIONAL PLAN - FAIR GO - SERVICES - IMPORTANCE OF ELECTRICITY - RENEWABLE ENERGY - MONEY - DISCRIMINATION - HYPOCRISY - POLLUTION - SISTER REGION: NORTH AND SOUTH DOUGLAS

The ARENA Powering Daintree Report - The AUSTROP response - The response to the AUSTROP response

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FNQ Regional Plan

The Far North Queensland Regional Plan 2009–2031 claims it is planning for a stronger, more liveable and sustainable community.
And for most regions in Queensland it does that, it identifies economic opportunities, and allocates resources, money and infrastructure to improve living conditions and economy for residents.

While this may be the case for most of Queensland, for the Daintree it is the total opposite, economically speaking the plan is a disaster for the Daintree commmunity which designates the Daintree area to be frozen in time with no improvement in services or infrastructure and no economic progress.

These Regional Plans are also the basis for local Council Planning Schemes, and it is a convenient excuse for Douglas Shire Council to keep the inadequate ferry as it is to keep raking in profits and to keep it as an economic handbrake on the Daintree to avoid progress that may require more services, such as garbage collecction, which is a standard service in even the poorest third world countries.

 

daintreefnqregionalplan

Some parts of the plan that relate to the Daintree:

Far North Queensland Regional Plan 2009–2031 planning for a stronger, more liveable and sustainable community.

The regional plan applies to the Far North Queensland (FNQ) regional local government areas as defined under IPA, section 2.5A.2. It replaces the Draft Far North Queensland Regional Plan 2025 (the draft plan) released by the regional planning Minister on 9 May 2008. The draft plan was subject to community consultation and comment up to 8 August 2008. A consultation report, which summarised the issues raised during the consultation period was released on 28 October 2008. Another round of limited consultation on four strategic issues identified in the consultation report concluded on 28 November 2008.
The regional plan has been prepared in good faith, taking into account all public submissions, to provide a framework for the management and development of FNQ for more than 20 years.
The regional plan represents an agreed Queensland Government position on the future of FNQ. Any plans, policies and codes being prepared or amended by state agencies or local governments must reflect and align with the regional plan.

Part D–Regional land use pattern 23
North coast The north coast contains significant areas of good quality agricultural land and areas of high ecological significance, including large areas of the Daintree and other Wet Tropics World Heritage rainforest. The former Douglas shire contains important scenic and ecological values that attract significant tourism. Growth north of Cairns is constrained by a lack of appropriate infrastructure.

The coastal settlements of Wonga, Newell and Cooya Beach and various other small urban centres and rural residential developments, including significant areas north of the Daintree River are not intended to grow or increase in density. These communities generally have very low levels of infrastructure provision and significant coastal and environmental constraints. Tourist development north of the Daintree River should be small-scale, nature-based and protect the unique ecological values and local character.

The car ferry crossing on the Daintree River will continue to limit development north of the river, while the road between the Daintree and Bloomfield Rivers will continue to be a scenic/adventure drive, adjacent to the Wet Tropics World Heritage area.

2.1.3 Development and infrastructure provision north of the Daintree River is managed to protect the significant biodiversity, scenic and ecological values of the area.
Aligned strategies

2.1.C The ferry crossing at the Daintree River is maintained to protect the World Heritage and scenic values of the area north of the Daintree River.
2.1.D The roads between Palm Cove and Port Douglas, and Daintree River to Bloomfield River are maintained as scenic routes.

Governments must work with Indigenous Traditional Owners and native title holders to protect and manage landscape values. The state has signed Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUAs) with the Eastern Kuku Yalanji people to cooperatively manage natural and cultural values on land in the Daintree area, and with the MaMu people for the MaMu rainforest canopy walkway west of Innsifail (see section 3.8)

The landscape and scenic elements of the former Douglas Shire are considered by many residents and visitors as being regionally significant. The policies included in this section protect these values of the area by:
• limiting urban growth and development north of the Daintree River
• designating the area between the Daintree River and the Bloomfield River as a regional landscape and rural production area •maintaining existing policies to maintain a the car ferry crossing on the Daintree River

• maintaining the roads between Palm Cove and Port Douglas, and the Daintree River to Bloomfield River as scenic routes.
It is important that development north of the Daintree River remains low key and sustainable to protect the scenic and World Heritage values and character of the area.
The existing access configuration and lack of mains power are two major reasons why the area north of the Daintree River has remained in a relatively undeveloped state. They are also the reasons why the area has maintained its heritage status and attractiveness to tourists. The Douglas Shire planning scheme provides for limited infrastructure provision north of the Daintree River, with a strong preference for self-sufficiency using sustainable technologies. The regional plan supports these elements of the scheme.

(Definition of sustainable; the quality of not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources, and thereby supporting long-term ecological balance:
Currently the government maintains the third world situation of hundreds of individual generators, which does NOT fit the definition of sustainable, because this is harmful to the environment, and it is depleting natural resources at a much higher rate than a grid does.)

The Daintree River ferry crossing is an important element of the tourist experience and tourism economy, creating a sense of destination and emphasising the isolation and significance of the area. The ferry limits the number of vehicles that can travel into the area during peak periods, which serves to limit undesirable crowding on roads and at visitor facilities. In this regard, maintaining a car ferry, as opposed to constructing a bridge crossing, remains a policy for the region.
The region is very vulnerable to rising fuel prices due to its heavy reliance on air and vehicle-based transport for the import and export of goods and services.

(It does not mention here that the Daintree region / community is vulnerable to rising fuel prices because of this community relying on diesel generators, this is what nearly killed Cape Tribulation in 2012)

it would not be appropriate to allow higher dwelling densities at Mission Beach than those identified in the current planning schemes due to the serious threat that increased traffic would have on the endangered southern cassowary. Similarly, it is not intended that dwelling densities increase in the area north of the Daintree River.

 

INTRODUCTION - THE LATEST POWER FIGHT - THE DAINTREE CONSPIRACY MUSEUM - EXCLUSION FROM THE GRID - BUILDING BAN - ACCESS RESTRICTIONS / THE DAINTREE FERRY - BLOOMFIELD TRACK - DAINTREE GATEWAY - GREAT BARRIER REEF DRIVE - DIVERSION TACTICS - BUYBACK - LOCAL COUNCIL - FNQ REGIONAL PLAN - FAIR GO - SERVICES - IMPORTANCE OF ELECTRICITY - RENEWABLE ENERGY - MONEY - DISCRIMINATION - HYPOCRISY - POLLUTION - SISTER REGION: NORTH AND SOUTH DOUGLAS