daintree conspiracy
Daintree Conspiracy
Devoted to equal rights for the Daintree Community and lifting the electricity embargo and other unfair economic sanctions.

Prepare to be amazed! Read about discrimination, hypocrisy, pollution, misfeasance and conspiracy!

INTRODUCTION - THE LATEST POWER FIGHT - THE DAINTREE CONSPIRACY MUSEUM - EXCLUSION FROM THE GRID - BUILDING BAN - ACCESS RESTRICTIONS / THE DAINTREE FERRY - BLOOMFIELD TRACK - DAINTREE GATEWAY - GREAT BARRIER REEF DRIVE - DIVERSION TACTICS - BUYBACK - LOCAL COUNCIL - FNQ REGIONAL PLAN - FAIR GO - SERVICES - IMPORTANCE OF ELECTRICITY - RENEWABLE ENERGY - MONEY - DISCRIMINATION - HYPOCRISY - POLLUTION - SISTER REGION: NORTH AND SOUTH DOUGLAS

The ARENA Powering Daintree Report - The AUSTROP response - The response to the AUSTROP response

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PLEASE COME BACK LATER AS MORE INFORMATION WILL BE ADDED

Pollution

You would expect that a place like the Daintree where a community is wedged in betweenthe two adjoining World Heritage areas of the Daintree rain forest and the Great Barrier Reef, that the government would insist on the cleanest possible energy supply, but no, in their efforts to discourage settlement and sabotage the local economy they give residents and businesses no support and basically force them to run generators.

This means that every year four million litres of fuel is trucked across the Daintree river and this is converted in hundreds of generators to approximately 10,000 tonnes of CO2 which blows in to the oldest rain forest in the world and contributes to the climate change that is affecting the Great Barrier Reef.


Piles of discarded lead-acid batteries sit around in the Daintree rain forest

 

Besides the CO2 emissions the Daintree community also works itself through a lot of engine oil that has to be discardeed, and equipment that has to be renewed on a regular basis, giving a whole new meaning to "renewable energy".
Battery banks last about seven years, and generators, inverters, battery chargers and solar panels also wear out and have to be discarded and replaced on a regular basis.

 

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Diesel Engines and Public Health

With mounting evidence that diesel exhaust poses major health hazards, reducing diesel pollution has become a public priority.
Health Impacts of Diesel Pollution

Diesel-powered vehicles and equipment account for nearly half of all nitrogen oxides (NOx) and more than two-thirds of all particulate matter (PM) emissions from US transportation sources.

Particulate matter or soot is created during the incomplete combustion of diesel fuel. Its composition often includes hundreds of chemical elements, including sulfates, ammonium, nitrates, elemental carbon, condensed organic compounds, and even carcinogenic compounds and heavy metals such as arsenic, selenium, cadmium and zinc.¹ Though just a fraction of the width of a human hair, particulate matter varies in size from coarse particulates (less than 10 microns in diameter) to fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns) to ultrafine particulates (less than 0.1 microns). Ultrafine particulates, which are small enough to penetrate the cells of the lungs, make up 80-95% of diesel soot pollution.

Particulate matter irritates the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, contributing to respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses and even premature death. Although everyone is susceptible to diesel soot pollution, children, the elderly, and individuals with preexisting respiratory conditions are the most vulnerable. Researchers estimate that, nationwide, tens of thousands of people die prematurely each year as a result of particulate pollution. Diesel engines contribute to the problem by releasing particulates directly into the air and by emitting nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides, which transform into "secondary" particulates in the atmosphere.

Diesel emissions of nitrogen oxides contribute to the formation of ground level ozone, which irritates the respiratory system, causing coughing, choking, and reduced lung capacity. Ground level ozone pollution, formed when nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbon emissions combine in the presence of sunlight, presents a hazard for both healthy adults and individuals suffering from respiratory problems. Urban ozone pollution has been linked to increased hospital admissions for respiratory problems such as asthma, even at levels below the federal standards for ozone.

Diesel exhaust has been classified a potential human carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Exposure to high levels of diesel exhaust has been shown to cause lung tumors in rats, and studies of humans routinely exposed to diesel fumes indicate a greater risk of lung cancer. For example, occupational health studies of railroad, dock, trucking, and bus garage workers exposed to high levels of diesel exhaust over many years consistently demonstrate a 20 to 50 percent increase in the risk of lung cancer or mortality.²

Diesel Pollution and Public Health Solutions

The public-health problems associated with diesel emissions have intensified efforts to develop viable solutions for reducing these emissions. Both federal and state governments have taken steps to reduce diesel emissions, but more work needs to be done.

Cleaner Fuels – The EPA has adopted more stringent fuel standards to reduce the amount of sulfur allowed in diesel fuel. These requirements went into effect in late 2006 for on-road diesel vehicles, while off-road diesel fuel used in construction equipment and trains will take effect over the next five years. Lower sulfur diesel fuel allows the use of advanced emission control technologies, which when combined, can reduce emissions more than 85 percent. The fuel used in ships visiting our port cities, however, is not subject to EPA's regulation and remains a significant source of diesel pollution.

New Engine Standards – New engine standards for diesel cars, trucks and heavy equipment have traditionally lagged far behind those for gasoline powered vehicles. For example, diesel construction equipment faced no emissions standards as late as 1996. With mounting pressure to clean-up diesel engines, the EPA has adopted standards for both heavy-duty trucks and off-road construction equipment and more recently for marine vessels and trains, which will phase in over the coming decade. Under current regulations, passenger cars and trucks are subject to the same emission standards regardless of the fuel they use.

On this website you can read:

The following reflect data from the Center for Disease Control, United States Consumer Product Safety Commission and Synovate, Inc., Multi-Client Research Group:
Current ICE Generator emissions kill approximately 500 people annually from carbon monoxide.
This number tripled between 2000 and 2005. Survivors could be affected with severe disabilities such as blindness, paralysis, Parkinson’s Disease, temporary emotional instability, memory loss, psychosis, dementia, incontinence, or peripheral neuropathy.
As late as 2005, 65% of people polled by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) mistakenly believe that it is safe to run a generator in a basement.
Small engines are environmentally unsound: Home generators emit as much carbon dioxide (CO) as 100 idling automobiles.
30% of the world’s CO problems are caused by small engines.
It is estimated that 40,000 people per year seek hospital room/ER treatment nationwide for CO poisoning. CO may manifest itself as flu-like symptoms.

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The ingredients of air pollution

Cars and trucks produce air pollution throughout their life, including pollution emitted during vehicle operation, refueling, manufacturing, and disposal. Additional emissions are associated with the refining and distribution of vehicle fuel.

Air pollution from cars and trucks is split into primary and secondary pollution. Primary pollution is emitted directly into the atmosphere; secondary pollution results from chemical reactions between pollutants in the atmosphere. The following are the major pollutants from motor vehicles:

Particulate matter (PM). These particles of soot and metals give smog its murky color. Fine particles — less than one-tenth the diameter of a human hair — pose the most serious threat to human health, as they can penetrate deep into lungs. PM is a direct (primary) pollution and a secondary pollution from hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and sulfer dioxides. Diesel exhaust is a major contributor to PM pollution.

Hydrocarbons (HC). These pollutants react with nitrogen oxides in the presence of sunlight to form ground level ozone, a primary ingredient in smog. Though beneficial in the upper atmosphere, at the ground level this gas irritates the respiratory system, causing coughing, choking, and reduced lung capacity.

Nitrogen oxides (NOx). These pollutants cause lung irritation and weaken the body's defenses against respiratory infections such as pneumonia and influenza. In addition, they assist in the formation of ground level ozone and particulate matter.

Carbon monoxide (CO). This odorless, colorless, and poisonous gas is formed by the combustion of fossil fuels such as gasoline and is emitted primarily from cars and trucks. When inhaled, CO blocks oxygen from the brain, heart, and other vital organs. Fetuses, newborn children, and people with chronic illnesses are especially susceptible to the effects of CO.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2). Power plants and motor vehicles create this pollutant by burning sulfur-containing fuels, especially diesel. Sulfur dioxide can react in the atmosphere to form fine particles and poses the largest health risk to young children and asthmatics.

Hazardous air pollutants (toxics). These chemical compounds have been linked to birth defects, cancer, and other serious illnesses. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the air toxics emitted from cars and trucks — which include Benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,3-butadiene — account for half of all cancers caused by air pollution.

INTRODUCTION - THE LATEST POWER FIGHT - THE DAINTREE CONSPIRACY MUSEUM - EXCLUSION FROM THE GRID - BUILDING BAN - ACCESS RESTRICTIONS / THE DAINTREE FERRY - BLOOMFIELD TRACK - DAINTREE GATEWAY - GREAT BARRIER REEF DRIVE - DIVERSION TACTICS - BUYBACK - LOCAL COUNCIL - FNQ REGIONAL PLAN - FAIR GO - SERVICES - IMPORTANCE OF ELECTRICITY - RENEWABLE ENERGY - MONEY - DISCRIMINATION - HYPOCRISY - POLLUTION - SISTER REGION: NORTH AND SOUTH DOUGLAS